Objections and applications for review

If you disagree with a decision of the BIG-register about your international qualification you can file an objection. When you do not agree with the decision on your objection, you can apply to the courts for judicial review.

If you have any questions about an official decision, please contact the BIG information line. Always mention the reference number on your letter.

Objections

Send your objection within 6 weeks of the date that is stated at the top of the letter that holds the decision. In your objection you should put your name and address, and the date and reference number of the letter (in the top right margin). Say why you do not agree with the decision. Remember to sign and date your objection.

Send your objection by post to:

Ministerie van Volksgezondheid, Welzijn en Sport
Directie Wetgeving en Juridische Zaken

Postbus 20350
2500 EJ Den Haag
The Netherlands

What happens with your objection?

The Department of Legislation and Legal Affairs (WJZ) of the Ministry of VWS will handle your appeal. It can seek advice from the internal review commission (General Administrative Law Act; Awb). The appeals commission listens to both motivations and will then give its recommendations.

You will have the opportunity to present your standpoint during an eventual hearing. The official who prepared the original decision will also explain the motivation for the decision.

The final decision is made by the Director of WJZ. You will receive the final decision and (when applicable) a copy of the commission’s advice by mail.

NB: Even if you make an appeal, your name will be struck from the BIG-register on the date that is mentioned in the decision. If your appeal is granted, we will reverse this cancellation.

Applications for review

If you disagree with the decision about your objection you can apply to the courts for a judicial review. Details of how to proceed are given at the bottom of the letter with the decision about your objection. If you disagree with the court’s ruling, you can then appeal to the Council of State (Raad van State).

See also